Time in a bottle

최순민展 / CHOISOONMIN / 崔淳珉 / painting   2019_0502 ▶︎ 2019_0616

최순민_Time in a bottle-Spring_혼합재료_80.3×130.3cm_2019

● 위 이미지를 클릭하면 네오룩 아카이브 Vol.20171206b | 최순민展으로 갑니다.

별도의 초대일시가 없습니다.

2019_0502 ▶︎ 2019_0510 관람시간 / 10:00am~07:00pm

아산병원 아산갤러리 서울 송파구 올림픽로43길 88 1층 Tel. +82.1688.7575 www.amc.seoul.kr

2019_0603 ▶︎ 2019_0616 관람시간 / 10:00am~07:00pm

SON'S GALLERY (formerly Art Gallery J316) Rämistrasse 28-30, 8001 Zurich, Switzerland Tel. +41.(0)77.455.27.61 www.sonsgalleryswiss.com

인생의 여정 가운데 삶의 모든 수고가 아름답게 보이기 시작했습니다. 그것은 제가 한없이 낮아졌을 때 마음의 창을 통해 보였습니다. 가족을 위해 오늘도 자신의 능력 이상으로 일을 하고 지하철의 손잡이를 간신히 잡고 있는 '아버지'의 모습에서 그리고 잠을 설친 듯 헝클어진 머리, 피곤한 모습으로 젖먹이 아이를 등에 업고 있는 '어머니'의 모습에서 보았습니다. 하루의 소소한 행복들이 제겐 근사한 풍경처럼 보입니다. 1995년 부터 동판화를 몇년간 했었는데 당시엔 작업공간이 협소해서  동판을 10×10cm 크기로 잘라 부식 시킨 후 이미지를 연결하는  작업을 했었습니다. 불편했던 작업 환경에서 했던 작업이  지금의 그림 스타일이 될 줄 그때는 몰랐습니다. 작업 과정 중에 수없이 행했던 시도들은 축적이 되서 자산이 되었습니다. 동판화 도구인 스퀴지, 니들, 면천, 망사들은 지금도 붓 대신으로 작업에 즐겨 사용하고 있습니다. 그래피티아트(낙서)작가인 스페인의 안토니오타피에 작품을 2005년에 보고 약간 혼란스러웠습니다. 건축재료의 거친 질감이 매력적으로 보여서 그림 재료에 대한 고정 관념이 흔들렸기 때문입니다. 재료를 폭 넓게 사용하게 된 계기가 되어 돌 가루를 밑 작업에 사용하고 있으며 창문의 의미를 직관적으로 보여줄 재료를 오래도록 찾다가 레진을 만났습니다. 미숙했지만 하나 하나 찾아 다니며 발견한 재료나 만났던 선한 사람들 역시 제게 큰 선물 입니다. 다양한 모습으로 집을 완성하다 보면 저는 두 손에 사탕을 움켜 쥔 6살 어린아이가 된 것 같은 행복감에 젖곤 합니다. ■ 최순민

최순민_Time in a bottle-Happiness_혼합재료_29.5×29.5cm×9_2019
최순민_Time in a bottle-Carperdiem 1_혼합재료_22.5×16.5cm×12_2019
최순민_Time in a bottle-I see you 1_혼합재료_47×47cm_2019
최순민_Time in a bottle-Candy_혼합재료_55.5×49.2cm_2019
최순민_Time in a bottle-Carperdiem 2_혼합재료_28×128cm_2019
최순민_Time in a bottle-Heart_혼합재료_66×47cm_2019
최순민_Time in a bottle-With_혼합재료_72.7×72.7cm_2019
최순민_Time in a bottle-Shall We Dance_혼합재료_116.7×91cm_2018
최순민_Time in a bottle-It's a Wonderful Life_혼합재료_91×116.7cm_2017

Soonmin Choi's Magnificent Spring Concerto ● While houses are often regarded as functionary places where people eat, sleep, and interact with one another, for many Koreans, houses are something more than just a domicile or fact of circumstance. The house represents a sensitivity of feeling with a lingering symbolic resonance deeply held within human consciousness, even as one may travel to another place. The house is a symbolic nexus of peace and quietude that reverberates within our sense of well-being. The house is, in fact, our home. It is the central location that begets feelings of brightness and intimacy. For this reason, houses in Korea, over centuries of time, hold a special significance. They are physical structures that carry a legacy of family histories. They include the process of living from day to day with parents, grandparents, and siblings, from generation to generation, over the course of years. The house in Korea is associated with warmth, security, happiness, grief, sorrow, pleasure, growth, withdrawal, evolution, realization, ecstasy, and much more. It is the place in the heart, a place that the mind will never forget. ● Soonmin Choi's ongoing series (since 2005) of modestly scaled paintings and mixed medium works, titled My Father's House, are about these kinds of memories. They express moments of sincere authenticity, in the purest sense. The bright colors and shapes held within Ms. Choi's miniature houses suggest moments given over to heightened feelings of quiet celebration and ebullient fulfillment. Her paintings are fundamental statements of faith as to what it means to be alive, healthy, and thriving in the wanderlust of nature. They are visual statements that hold magical memories of her deepest feelings and, in this sense, they are ultimately works of art. They communicate the intimacy of human beings living together and the positive feelings toward one another. Even as the artist comments on the hardships and difficulties endured by her beloved Father as she was growing up and coming of age as an adult, Soonmin Choi's paintings point in the direction of the ideal. ● The significant of these paintings goes beyond the obvious. They are neither avant-garde nor classical in their delivery. They are poetic works of art that transmit the truth of the artist's presence. As one studies these forms, they offer a reminder of the subtle delivery of human experience through signs and symbols. They express an open-minded belief in the optimism of the human spirit. Soonmin Choi's miniature houses are more than houses. They are signs of inexorable delight that tell us a tale about occupying planet Earth and importance of fulfilling nature's purpose. ● Ms. Choi's sensibility is a compassionate one. Her paintings fulfill one of the major paradoxes of art – that to feel compassion for others is find the passion to do one's work. Through this energy, Ms. Choi has discovered a special way of working. She begins with a hard wood surface on which she layers sheets of hanji (traditional Korean mulberry paper), one over another. Often she will mix sand or grit from crushed rocks into her pigments and inks. Occasionally she will etch or scratch lines into the surface, which will become the ground on which her house reside. In the act of painting, Choi focuses on a very particular vocabulary of essential or "primary shapes." The house is a child-like pentagon: the first symbol of a house, always with a peaked roof. Within these primary pentagon shapes, the artist will paint very thin multi-colored lines or bead-like swirls, applying one dot or dash at a time until the swirling sensation is visually complete. Sometimes the dots are infinitesimal Impressionist ones, barely visible, similar to the manner paintings used by the great French colorist, Pierre Bonnard. ● Ms. Choi's sensibility is a compassionate one. Her paintings fulfill one of the major paradoxes of art – that to feel compassion for others is find the passion to do one's work. Through this energy, Ms. Choi has discovered a special way of working. She begins with a hard wood surface on which she layers sheets of hanji (traditional Korean mulberry paper), one over another. Often she will mix sand or grit from crushed rocks into her pigments and inks. Occasionally she will etch or scratch lines into the surface, which will become the ground on which her house reside. In the act of painting, Choi focuses on a very particular vocabulary of essential or "primary shapes." The house is a child-like pentagon: the first symbol of a house, always with a peaked roof. Within these primary pentagon shapes, the artist will paint very thin multi-colored lines or bead-like swirls, applying one dot or dash at a time until the swirling sensation is visually complete. Sometimes the dots are infinitesimal Impressionist ones, barely visible, similar to the manner paintings used by the great French colorist, Pierre Bonnard. ● Other times the ground is dazzling in its multifarious density, its fine quality of richness, reminiscent of the soil necessary to gestate vegetable roots, ginger, and grapes. In these built-up fields, filled with a spacious, yet illusory depth, Soonmin Choi encounters a coy resemblance to the work of Jean Dubuffet's Readings of the Soil (1957). In each case, the tenacity of the ground reveals an expressive quality that holds defiance with nature, a statement of eternal presence that the soil offers in relation to sky and water, fire and air. These are the elements of the environment that surround the preeminent house and the neighborhoods culled from the imagination. ● There are circles and rings often seen in My Father's House. Often Choi's fastidiously designed houses with stand independently and other time in groups or with a smaller house turned sideways. On some occasions, one will confront angular planes in primary colors – a wedge of blue or yellow or red – encroaching from the side of the painting or emanating from one of the corners. A small chirping bird occasionally appears either outside or within the house. The bird carries an important presence of ongoing life and hope, the tactile and ethereal substance of joy. It offers a transensory sign that moves from vision to sound, the gentle sound of a beautiful spring day, which is, in fact, the metaphor that transmits throughout My Father's House. ● Scholar, poet, artist, curator, and critic, Robert C. Morgan writes frequently on the art of contemporary Chinese and Korean artists. He is the New York Editor of Asian Art News and teaches at the School of Visual Arts in New York. In 2005, Dr. Morgan was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in the Republic of Korea. ■ Robert C. Morgan

Vol.20190502f | 최순민展 / CHOISOONMIN / 崔淳珉 / painting